qualification/training question

John Oxley john_oxley at blueyonder.co.uk
Tue Nov 18 14:37:10 GMT 2003


Some comments....

I took the Sun Sys Admin (SCSA Sol8) tests for two reasons, firstly
because it was easier to get than the RHCE (respect!) Also because the
next exam SCNA (Network Admin) covers alot of the IP basics required by
Cisco CCNA.

Also bear in mind that the Cisco exams start with CCNA which expires after
2 years if you don't keep taking the next level of exams, the Sun one's
don't expire, your chosen version of OS will simply eventually go out of
favour, but your IP knowledge is still good.

If you want basic security, Sun offer this as well after which maybe the
CISSP is favorite...

Chances are whatever you certify in it will not be 'viable' in 10 years
but if you have a track record of staying current with your chosen
technology it can't harm your career...

--
JohnO.
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                                           (_ )
UNIX is "user-friendly",                \\\", ) ^
it's just picky about its friends!        \/, \(
                                         cXc_/_)
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> My two pennies....
>
> I did the RHCE course. I'd been doing linux/unix for a few years already
> so
> it wasn't so much the training I went for, just to know what would be
> tested
> and what I didn't know :)
> Its obviously a bit redhat specific in places, but will hopefully help
> convince an employer you have a passable grounding in samba, nfs, squid,
> httpd, dhcp, disks and networking and so on.
> I think there is too much to cover to examine throughly in one day, and
> don't expect to know nothing about linux/unix and learn enough in the 4
> day
> course to pass.
>
> I think the cisco qualifications aren't bad, but again, the course I sat
> (4
> days) is nowhere near enough to ensure you pass the exams. I've a feeling
> there will still be a good deal of cisco gear still in use 10 years from
> now, but to pass the test requires a reasonable grounding in IP, not just
> how to drive a cisco.
>
> I've also heard very complimentary things about the Sun sysadmin courses,
> and people I've met who've sat them have all been pretty good.
>
> GavsDavs
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: freebsd-users-admin at uk.freebsd.org
> [mailto:freebsd-users-admin at uk.freebsd.org]On Behalf Of Simon Gray
> Sent: 18 November 2003 13:48
> To: FreeBSD Users UK Mailing List
> Subject: qualification/training question
>
>
> Hi,
>
> I know a similar item to this came up in the list back in 2001. (according
> to google) This isn't directed specifically at fbsd but as the users
> experience as a whole.
>
> I'm 21 been in IT 5 years, don't really have many qualifications apart
> from
> some college course and general experience (computers since 93). A
> colleague
> of mine who's just finished his CISSP, has suggested I give that a look -
> which I admit it does look good since its not vendor specific.
>
> Theres always the Cisco/Microsoft courses, but in 10 years time those
> aren't
> really going to be worth much. Any suggestions on qualifications I should
> maybe look towards?
>
> Sorry if this is a little off the topic.
>
> Many thanks,
>
> Simon
>
>
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